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Let's teach! Primary

Lesson 3

Rules for different situations

Lesson Plan

Preparation

Label two boxes, one ‘Fair’ and the other ‘Not fair’, for use in the Conclusion activity.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK071, ACHASSK062, ACHASSK069, ACHASSI052, ACHASSI053, ACHASSI054, ACHASSI056, ACHASSI058, ACHASSI059, ACHASSI061
  • NSW Syllabus: HT2-1, GE2-1
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCL004, VCHHK072, VCGGK084
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK071, ACHASSK062, ACHASSK069, WAHASS27, WAHASS28, WAHASS29, WAHASS33, WAHASS35, WAHASS36, WAHASS37

Suggested teaching strategies

  • For the Introduction activity, use a cloud chart to list all the reasons students might think rules change in different situations.

Introduction

Display the digital lesson on your smartboard to introduce rules in different situations and how they change. Discuss as a class what the students think they might know about the reason for rules changing in different situations.

Development

Provide students with worksheets 1 and 2 to complete.

The investigation worksheet relates to concepts about rules for cultural groups. As a class, discuss students’ experiences with ‘Welcome to Country’ ceremonies and sacred sites. Why is there a need for rules?

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can have the information on the worksheets read to them and the activities conducted as a discussion.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can draw a bird’s-eye view map of their house and label each room. They then think of a type of rule—e.g. noise, movement, caring for places, safety—and write a rule in each room. Students can then observe any similarities and differences and share their learning with a partner.
  • An additional activity is to create a digital Venn diagram to compare two places or situations where rules need to be followed; e.g. library and playground, classroom and bathroom. Students then discuss what is common to both.

Conclusion

Students share a rule related to noise and the class guesses the place it applies to. Select students to then share a rule related to movement for the class to guess which situation it applies to. Students can then individually write on a strip of paper why the rules change in different places and put their answer into a box, one labelled ‘Fair’ the other labelled ‘Not fair’.

Assessment

Worksheet 1 answers
Teacher check

Worksheet 2 answers
1. (a) ceremony (b) person (c) recognised (d) before (e) Welcome (f) dancing (g) groups
2. (a) True (b) True (c) False (d) True

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Preparation

Label two boxes, one ‘Fair’ and the other ‘Not fair’, for use in the Conclusion activity.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK071, ACHASSK062, ACHASSK069, ACHASSI052, ACHASSI053, ACHASSI054, ACHASSI056, ACHASSI058, ACHASSI059, ACHASSI061
  • NSW Syllabus: HT2-1, GE2-1
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCL004, VCHHK072, VCGGK084
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK071, ACHASSK062, ACHASSK069, WAHASS27, WAHASS28, WAHASS29, WAHASS33, WAHASS35, WAHASS36, WAHASS37

Suggested teaching strategies

  • For the Introduction activity, use a cloud chart to list all the reasons students might think rules change in different situations.

Introduction

Display the digital lesson on your smartboard to introduce rules in different situations and how they change. Discuss as a class what the students think they might know about the reason for rules changing in different situations.

Development

Provide students with worksheets 1 and 2 to complete.

The investigation worksheet relates to concepts about rules for cultural groups. As a class, discuss students’ experiences with ‘Welcome to Country’ ceremonies and sacred sites. Why is there a need for rules?

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can have the information on the worksheets read to them and the activities conducted as a discussion.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can draw a bird’s-eye view map of their house and label each room. They then think of a type of rule—e.g. noise, movement, caring for places, safety—and write a rule in each room. Students can then observe any similarities and differences and share their learning with a partner.
  • An additional activity is to create a digital Venn diagram to compare two places or situations where rules need to be followed; e.g. library and playground, classroom and bathroom. Students then discuss what is common to both.

Conclusion

Students share a rule related to noise and the class guesses the place it applies to. Select students to then share a rule related to movement for the class to guess which situation it applies to. Students can then individually write on a strip of paper why the rules change in different places and put their answer into a box, one labelled ‘Fair’ the other labelled ‘Not fair’.

Assessment

Worksheet 1 answers
Teacher check

Worksheet 2 answers
1. (a) ceremony (b) person (c) recognised (d) before (e) Welcome (f) dancing (g) groups
2. (a) True (b) True (c) False (d) True

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Student Pages

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Intro 1

Lesson 3

Rules for different situations

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 intro 2

Lesson 3

Rules for different situations

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CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 1

Rules can change depending on the place or situation.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 2

Two rules that often change are how much you can move and how much noise you can make.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 3

Think about when you go to see a movie.

Can you identify the reasons for the noise and movement rules in each situation?

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 4

As you sit in the theatre, you should be very quiet and not move from your seat.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 5

When the movie is finished, you should leave by walking through the cinema and talking at a low volume.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 6

Once you are outside the cinema, you can talk louder. If you are in a car park or on a pathway you should still walk. If your cinema is next to an open grassed area, you could run around there.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 7

Finally, you get into your car to go home. At this point, you should sit very still again.

Some families talk and sing loudly in their cars. Others like to be quiet.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 8

Do you think you understood every reason why you should act in those ways?

Let’s go through them now.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 9

When you’re in the theatre, talking or moving around distracts everyone else watching the movie.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 10

As you exit through the cinema, people in the other theatres can still hear you if you talk too loud.

If you move quickly or run indoors, you might hurt someone.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 11

Even though there’s more space outside, people still walk on the pathways.

But it’s okay to talk a little louder since it doesn’t bother anyone.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 12

Some families don’t mind being loud in cars because it’s hard for people outside the car to hear you.

But if your family asks you to be quiet, it’s because they need to concentrate on driving. This is the same reason you shouldn’t move much in the car—being distracting is dangerous.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 13

It is interesting how much those rules can change in the span of a few minutes. It can seem a lot to remember!

But by being aware of and caring about others, you should be able to know the rules you need to follow.

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Slide 14

Do you think these changing rules are fair?

Why or why not?

CivCit Year 3 Unit 2 Lesson 3 Final Slide

Lesson 3

Complete

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Downloads

Worksheet

Activities for students to complete

Investigation Worksheet

An additional activity to consolidate learnings

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