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Let's teach! Primary

Lesson 5

Laws and the people involved

Lesson Plan

Preparation

Search online for various images of different law enforcers—e.g. police officer, customs officer, ranger—to show in the Introduction activity.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK092, ACHASSI074, ACHASSI075, ACHASSI079, ACHASSI080, ACHASSI081, ACHASSI082
  • NSW Syllabus: n/a
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCL005
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK092, WAHASS26, WAHASS28, WAHASS29, WAHASS35, WAHASS37, WAHASS39

Suggested teaching strategies

  • Conduct a gallery walk for the investigation worksheet activity, so students can read others’ work and and comment at the end.

Introduction

Display some images of various law enforcers. Ask students to suggest who these pictures are of and what the topic of the lesson may be.

Display the digital lesson on your smartboard to introduce different types of laws and who enforces them.

Development

Provide students with worksheets 1 and 2 to complete.

The investigation worksheet requires students to think about an imaginary lawless society in the future. A discussion with a partner or small group may be useful before completing the worksheet.

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can either write fewer sentences or use bullet points for the investigation worksheet.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can compile a book of rules and laws that affect the students around their school, including the consequences for breaking these.
  • An additional activity is to present scenarios to students and discuss the difference between the right to freedom and the need to obey the rules and the law; e.g. a student may not like wearing the colour blue, but at school they don’t have a choice if it is their faction colour.

Conclusion

Students to role-play different rule/law enforcers and rules/laws being broken; e.g. a police officer and a car thief.

Ask students to volunteer to read out their journal entries from the investigation worksheet or display them for students to read later.

Assessment

Worksheet 1 answers
Teacher check

Worksheet 2 answers
1. QLD police officer: state
customs officer: federal
ranger: local
2. QLD police officer: speeding, stealing, murder, bank robbery
customs officer: illegal food importing and exporting, drug smuggling, people smuggling, illegal goods or goods that need duty paid
ranger: noise complaints, animal control, parking offences, littering
3. Teacher check. Answer should indicate that there is a need for new laws as the world and technology changes.
4. Teacher check

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Preparation

Search online for various images of different law enforcers—e.g. police officer, customs officer, ranger—to show in the Introduction activity.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK092, ACHASSI074, ACHASSI075, ACHASSI079, ACHASSI080, ACHASSI081, ACHASSI082
  • NSW Syllabus: n/a
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCL005
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK092, WAHASS26, WAHASS28, WAHASS29, WAHASS35, WAHASS37, WAHASS39

Suggested teaching strategies

  • Conduct a gallery walk for the investigation worksheet activity, so students can read others’ work and and comment at the end.

Introduction

Display some images of various law enforcers. Ask students to suggest who these pictures are of and what the topic of the lesson may be.

Display the digital lesson on your smartboard to introduce different types of laws and who enforces them.

Development

Provide students with worksheets 1 and 2 to complete.

The investigation worksheet requires students to think about an imaginary lawless society in the future. A discussion with a partner or small group may be useful before completing the worksheet.

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can either write fewer sentences or use bullet points for the investigation worksheet.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can compile a book of rules and laws that affect the students around their school, including the consequences for breaking these.
  • An additional activity is to present scenarios to students and discuss the difference between the right to freedom and the need to obey the rules and the law; e.g. a student may not like wearing the colour blue, but at school they don’t have a choice if it is their faction colour.

Conclusion

Students to role-play different rule/law enforcers and rules/laws being broken; e.g. a police officer and a car thief.

Ask students to volunteer to read out their journal entries from the investigation worksheet or display them for students to read later.

Assessment

Worksheet 1 answers
Teacher check

Worksheet 2 answers
1. QLD police officer: state
customs officer: federal
ranger: local
2. QLD police officer: speeding, stealing, murder, bank robbery
customs officer: illegal food importing and exporting, drug smuggling, people smuggling, illegal goods or goods that need duty paid
ranger: noise complaints, animal control, parking offences, littering
3. Teacher check. Answer should indicate that there is a need for new laws as the world and technology changes.
4. Teacher check

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Student Pages

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Intro 1

Lesson 5

Laws and the people involved

CivCitYear 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 intro 2

Lesson 5

Laws and the people involved

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CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 1

For rules and laws to work, there must be someone who checks these are being followed and can act when they are broken.

We say these people enforce rules and laws.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 2

Who exactly is in charge of enforcing rules and laws?

It depends on the location.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 3

Firstly, can you think of any examples of places where you need to follow rules? Who enforces these?

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 4

Your classroom and house are
two simple examples of where you must follow rules.

Your family enforces rules at home and your teacher does
so in the classroom.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 5

You also need to follow rules when you play games with others.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 6

Umpire

Moderator

If you play a sport, an umpire enforces the rules. If you play games online,
a moderator enforces
the rules.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 7

How about laws?

Where do you need to follow laws? Who enforces these?

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 8

The easiest example of a law enforcer is a police officer. A police officer can enforce rules in most places.

But there are other examples.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 9

Do you remember the three levels of government?

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 10

They are local, state and federal.

Just as there are three levels
of law-making, there are
three levels of law-enforcing.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 11

At the local level, a ranger can enforce laws.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 12

At the state level, a state police officer can enforce laws. Public transport officers can do so too.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 13

At the federal level, a federal police officer can enforce laws.
So can a customs officer at an international airport.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 14

All have different responsibilities to manage at their levels of law enforcement.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 15

While these people can enforce laws and sometimes issue punishments (including on-the-spot fines), usually the responsibility of judging a crime is placed on the courts.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Slide 16

Do you know about any other responsibilities the different levels of law enforcement involve?

How could you find out more?

CivCit Year 4 Unit 2 Lesson 5 Final Slide

Lesson 5

Complete

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Downloads

Worksheet

Activities for students to complete

Investigation Worksheet

An additional activity to consolidate learnings

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