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Let's teach! Primary

Lesson 2

Diverse beliefs, traditions and symbols

Lesson Plan

Preparation

Aside from readying copies of the student worksheets and investigation worksheet, no other preparation is necessary for this lesson.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK093, ACHASSK083, ACHASSK086, ACHASSI073, ACHASSI074, ACHASSI075, ACHASSI077, ACHASSI078, ACHASSI079, ACHASSI081
  • NSW Syllabus: HT2-3, HT2-4
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCC007, VCHHC069, VCHHK078, VCHHK081
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK086, WAHASS27, WAHASS28, WAHASS29, WAHASS32, WAHASS33, WAHASS35, WAHASS39

Note: Italicised links relate to HASS areas other than Civics and Citizenship.


Suggested teaching strategies

  • Students share their family totem (from Conclusion activity) in small groups to allow for deeper discussion.
  • Use a KWL chart to record what students know about beliefs and diversity in the introduction activity and add to it as the lesson progresses.

Introduction

Discuss what a belief is as a class and ask students to give examples.

Display the digital lesson on your smartboard to introduce diverse beliefs, traditions and symbols.

Development

Provide students with worksheets 1 and 2 to complete.

The investigation worksheet requires students to explore and research totem groups of the Aboriginal nations. Read through the text at the top of the page as a class and discuss to ensure students understand the topic.

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can survey fewer children for worksheet 2 and work with a partner for the activities.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can consider what the world would be like if everyone believed the same thing. Students make notes and record a short video.
  • An additional activity is to create a book or poster of common symbols that represent various groups in Australia, including political parties, religions, social groups and sports teams.

Conclusion

Compare the class results from the survey on student worksheet 2. Discuss the various differences and similarities.

Students also share their family totem from the investigation worksheet and explain what it means.

Assessment

Worksheet 1 answers
1. Suggested answer: A belief is an opinion we form and information we gain that we believe to be true and influences the way we choose to live our lives.
2. British colonists
Possessions: Those in charge take ownership. Taking something that belongs to another person is stealing.
Aboriginal people
Education: Songs, dance, art and storytelling provide life education. Written language does not exist.
Beliefs: Many ancestral beings created the country, plants and animals. Told through Dreamtime stories.
Medicine: Includes herbal remedies, amulets and ceremonies. Spiritual doctors performed sacred rites for seriously ill.
Clothing: People can be natural like the animals and there is no shame.
3. Teacher check

Worksheet 2 answers
Teacher check

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Preparation

Aside from readying copies of the student worksheets and investigation worksheet, no other preparation is necessary for this lesson.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK093, ACHASSK083, ACHASSK086, ACHASSI073, ACHASSI074, ACHASSI075, ACHASSI077, ACHASSI078, ACHASSI079, ACHASSI081
  • NSW Syllabus: HT2-3, HT2-4
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCC007, VCHHC069, VCHHK078, VCHHK081
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK086, WAHASS27, WAHASS28, WAHASS29, WAHASS32, WAHASS33, WAHASS35, WAHASS39

Note: Italicised links relate to HASS areas other than Civics and Citizenship.


Suggested teaching strategies

  • Students share their family totem (from Conclusion activity) in small groups to allow for deeper discussion.
  • Use a KWL chart to record what students know about beliefs and diversity in the introduction activity and add to it as the lesson progresses.

Introduction

Discuss what a belief is as a class and ask students to give examples.

Display the digital lesson on your smartboard to introduce diverse beliefs, traditions and symbols.

Development

Provide students with worksheets 1 and 2 to complete.

The investigation worksheet requires students to explore and research totem groups of the Aboriginal nations. Read through the text at the top of the page as a class and discuss to ensure students understand the topic.

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can survey fewer children for worksheet 2 and work with a partner for the activities.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can consider what the world would be like if everyone believed the same thing. Students make notes and record a short video.
  • An additional activity is to create a book or poster of common symbols that represent various groups in Australia, including political parties, religions, social groups and sports teams.

Conclusion

Compare the class results from the survey on student worksheet 2. Discuss the various differences and similarities.

Students also share their family totem from the investigation worksheet and explain what it means.

Assessment

Worksheet 1 answers
1. Suggested answer: A belief is an opinion we form and information we gain that we believe to be true and influences the way we choose to live our lives.
2. British colonists
Possessions: Those in charge take ownership. Taking something that belongs to another person is stealing.
Aboriginal people
Education: Songs, dance, art and storytelling provide life education. Written language does not exist.
Beliefs: Many ancestral beings created the country, plants and animals. Told through Dreamtime stories.
Medicine: Includes herbal remedies, amulets and ceremonies. Spiritual doctors performed sacred rites for seriously ill.
Clothing: People can be natural like the animals and there is no shame.
3. Teacher check

Worksheet 2 answers
Teacher check

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Student Pages

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Intro warning

Lesson 2

WARNING: This lesson may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased.

CivCit Year 4 nit 3 Lesson 2 Intro 1

Lesson 2

Diverse beliefs and traditions

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Intro 2

Lesson 2

Diverse beliefs and traditions

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CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 1

People can belong to many different groups.

These may include cultural, social or religious groups, among others.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 2

The reasons someone belongs to a group changes according to the
type of group.

Social groups depend on what people enjoy doing in their spare time. Cultural groups involve family background or where someone has lived.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 3

In general, the groups you are part of involves identity.

This includes your likes, dislikes, history, skills, values, family, friends and more.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 4

But just as identity affects the groups you belong to, the groups you belong to affect identity.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 5

What does that mean?

It means the groups you are part of can change your traditions and beliefs.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 6

For example, if you are
Muslim, you observe the
tradition of Ramadan as
part of that religion.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 7

Or if you are part of a sports team, your coach and team members may encourage the belief of good sportsmanship.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 8

In the past, some people did
not appreciate the beliefs and traditions of different groups, especially cultural groups.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 9

When Captain Cook arrived in Australia in 1770, most Aboriginal people had never seen Europeans before. They had been isolated from the rest of the world.

The two groups had completely different cultures.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 10

It soon became clear that this meant there were many differences between the beliefs of the British and those of the Indigenous people of Australia.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 11

For example, the British
believed it was necessary for people to be able to read and write. But Aboriginal groups shared their histories and information orally and sometimes visually; they had
no need for reading and writing.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 12

Unfortunately, the British wanted the Aboriginal people to change their beliefs.

One of the ways they did this was by removing ATSI children and placing them in missionaries, where they had to learn English and were forbidden to speak traditional languages.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 13

This terrible act separated children from their families and their culture. Many today still suffer
the impacts of this cruelty.

Civ Cit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 14

In the present, we recognise the importance of respecting different beliefs and traditions.

For example, there are now centres across the country where everyone can learn the languages and traditions of many Indigenous groups.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 15

What is one tradition that you celebrate?

Civ Cit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 16

If you listen to your class
members, you’ll see a lot of people have very different traditions to you.

This is because of the different groups they belong to.

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 17

Consider the tradition you chose. You have this tradition because
of a group you belong to.

Can you name what group this is? What kind of group is it?

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Slide 18

Can you name a belief you have because of a group
you belong to?

CivCit Year 4 Unit 3 Lesson 2 Final Slide

Lesson 2

Complete

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Downloads

Worksheet

Activities for students to complete

Investigation Worksheet

An additional activity to consolidate learnings

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