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Let's teach! Primary

Lesson 4

Levels of government in Australia

Lesson Plan

Preparation

Students will require internet access throughout the lesson.

Locate the ‘Three levels of government’ quiz on the Parliamentary Education Office website for use in the conclusion activity.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK144, ACHASSK150, ACHASSI123, ACHASSI124, ACHASSI127, ACHASSI128, ACHASSI129, ACHASSI131, ACHASSI133
  • NSW Syllabus: n/a
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCG009, VCEBC005
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK144, ACHASSK150, WAHASS52, WAHASS53, WAHASS56, WAHASS57, WAHASS59, WAHASS60, WAHASS61, WAHASS62

Note: Italicised links relate to HASS areas other than Civics and Citizenship.

Suggested teaching strategies

  • Use a gallery walk for students to display and observe each other’s persuasive text from worksheet 1. Alternatively, compile them into a digital file and email it to students to read later.

Introduction

Display the digital lesson on the whiteboard to introduce the responsibilities and areas of funding for each level of government.

Development

Provide students with worksheets 1 and 2 to complete.

The investigation worksheet explores local government. It may be beneficial to read through the text at the top of the page as a class and clarify student understanding.

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can write bullet points for the persuasive text on worksheet 1. Students can also be allocated an area that the state/territory spends money on to argue for.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can write a letter to the local council about an issue that they want action taken on; e.g. a new swimming pool in your local park, the number of owners not cleaning up after their dogs on pathways in the local park.
  • An additional activity is to research the local council’s budget. Explore how much money it receives and how it gets it, as well as how it is spent.

Conclusion

Complete an online quiz about the three levels of government. Students share their responses to Question 2 on worksheet 1.

Assessment

Worksheet 1 answers
Teacher check

Worksheet 2 answers
1. Teacher check
2. (a) False (b) False (c) True (d) False
3.–4. Teacher check

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Preparation

Students will require internet access throughout the lesson.

Locate the ‘Three levels of government’ quiz on the Parliamentary Education Office website for use in the conclusion activity.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK144, ACHASSK150, ACHASSI123, ACHASSI124, ACHASSI127, ACHASSI128, ACHASSI129, ACHASSI131, ACHASSI133
  • NSW Syllabus: n/a
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCG009, VCEBC005
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK144, ACHASSK150, WAHASS52, WAHASS53, WAHASS56, WAHASS57, WAHASS59, WAHASS60, WAHASS61, WAHASS62

Note: Italicised links relate to HASS areas other than Civics and Citizenship.

Suggested teaching strategies

  • Use a gallery walk for students to display and observe each other’s persuasive text from worksheet 1. Alternatively, compile them into a digital file and email it to students to read later.

Introduction

Display the digital lesson on the whiteboard to introduce the responsibilities and areas of funding for each level of government.

Development

Provide students with worksheets 1 and 2 to complete.

The investigation worksheet explores local government. It may be beneficial to read through the text at the top of the page as a class and clarify student understanding.

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can write bullet points for the persuasive text on worksheet 1. Students can also be allocated an area that the state/territory spends money on to argue for.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can write a letter to the local council about an issue that they want action taken on; e.g. a new swimming pool in your local park, the number of owners not cleaning up after their dogs on pathways in the local park.
  • An additional activity is to research the local council’s budget. Explore how much money it receives and how it gets it, as well as how it is spent.

Conclusion

Complete an online quiz about the three levels of government. Students share their responses to Question 2 on worksheet 1.

Assessment

Worksheet 1 answers
Teacher check

Worksheet 2 answers
1. Teacher check
2. (a) False (b) False (c) True (d) False
3.–4. Teacher check

Investigation worksheet answers
Teacher check

Student Pages

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Intro 1

Lesson 4

Levels of government in Australia

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Intro 2

Lesson 4

Levels of government in Australia

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CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 1

In Australia, there are three levels of government: federal, state and territory and local.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 2

Each level has different areas of responsibility, but all three are in charge of their own finance.
That means each level must source the money that will fund their work.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 3

One prominent source of government funding is tax.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 4

Tax is extra money that everyone has to pay when they buy things, receive wages or own certain items.

For example, if you buy a two-dollar chocolate bar about ten cents of that sale goes to the government.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 5

You might wonder if that’s fair. Why doesn’t the store receive all the money? The government didn’t make or sell the chocolate.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 6

Education

Emergency services

Roads

The reason is that everybody
uses the services the
government provides.

Because of the government, all children can go to school, emergency services are always ready to assist, roads are built and Australia maintains positive relationships with other countries.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 7

If the government didn’t have money, the roads the chocolate bar travelled to reach the store wouldn’t have been built and agreements that allow us to bring ingredients from other countries to make chocolate wouldn’t exist.

Taxes are a trade-off for the benefits everyone receives.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 8

The Federal government in particular gets its funding from income tax (tax on what people earn), goods and services tax (tax on what people buy) and company tax (tax on whole company earnings).

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 9

The areas the Federal government is responsible for include defence, trade, immigration and the environment.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 10

Defence

Trade

Immigration

Environment

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 11

Along with funding these areas, the Federal government allocates part of its budget to the state/territory and local governments.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 12

The Federal government also holds Parliament to make laws regarding its areas of responsibility.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 13

Aside from Federal funding, state and territory governments receive money from land tax (annual tax on owned land), payroll tax (tax on what employers pay employees), motor vehicle tax (annual tax on the vehicles one owns) and stamp duty (extra money people must pay for particular items, like cars and houses).

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 14

Emergency services

Schools

Roads and railways

The areas state and territory governments are responsible for include emergency services, schools, hospitals, roads and railways.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 15

State and territory governments also hold Parliament to create laws involving these areas.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 16

Along with funding from the Federal government, local governments collect money from property owners (also called ‘rates’), fines, licenses and permits.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 17

Rubbish collection

Parks

Pet control

The areas local governments are responsible for include rubbish collection, recreational facilities, parks and gardens, town planning and pet control.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 18

Local governments do not hold Parliament. Instead, elected representatives (called ‘councillors’) attend regular meetings to create rules called bylaws.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Slide 19

What do you suppose are the advantages of having these three levels of government as opposed to one level?

Is this is a good way for Australia to operate?

CivCit Year 6 Unit 1 Lesson 4 Final Slide

Lesson 4

Complete

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Downloads

Worksheet

Activities for students to complete

Investigation Worksheet

An additional activity to consolidate learnings

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