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Let's teach! Primary

Lesson Plan

Preparation

Students will require internet access throughout the lesson.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK147, ACHASSK135, ACHASSI123, ACHASSI126, ACHASSI128, ACHASSI129, ACHASSI131, ACHASSI132, ACHASSI133
  • NSW Syllabus: HT3-3, HT3-4
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCC014, VCHHK094
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK147, ACHASSK135, WAHASS52, WAHASS56, WAHASS59, WAHASS60, WAHASS61, WAHASS63

Note: Italicised links relate to HASS areas other than Civics and Citizenship.

Suggested teaching strategies

  • Use turn and talk for the Introduction activity, where students find a partner to discuss the definition with.
  • Jigsaw could be used for the Conclusion activity, where expert groups view a particular video story and then report back to their home groups about the story they saw and the category of citizenship.

Introduction

Students discuss with a partner and write a definition for ‘Australian citizen’, then share as a class.

Display the digital lesson which introduces what an Australian citizen is and how to become one.

Development

Provide students with the summary and worksheet to complete.

The investigation explores the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizens. It may be useful to watch a Behind the News video, Why is citizenship important? before completing the worksheet. This will introduce the idea of responsibilities so students can go on to conduct their own research.

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can be provided with books or research information to use for the investigation worksheet, and discuss the questions with a partner.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can print, cut and fold a chatterbox from the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs website (search for ‘chatterbox’) and play with it.
  • An additional activity is to interview a new Australian citizen to hear their citizenship story. Prepare practical and probing questions to find out as much as possible about their journey, and create a video of the interview.

Conclusion

Go to the Celebrating citizenship area of the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs website, and watch video stories of various Australians as a class.

Assessment

Student summary answers
1. Across: 3. evidence 4. apply 6. residential Down: 1. conferral 2. legalised 5. eligible
2. Teacher check

Worksheet answers
1. Teacher check
2. (a) citizenship by conferral, citizenship by descent, citizenship by adoption, citizenship by resumption
(b) Quan: yes (adoption)
Cheryl: yes (descent)
Janet: no
Wayan: yes (conferral)
Joanne: yes (resumption)
lmran: no

Investigation worksheet answers
1. Responsibilities—obey the law; defend Australia should the need arise; serve on a jury if called to do so; vote in federal and state or territory elections, and in a referendum
Privileges—vote in federal and state or territory elections, and in a referendum, apply for work in the Australian Public Service or in the Australian Defence Force; seek election to parliament; apply for an Australian passport and re-enter Australia freely; receive help from an Australian official while overseas; register children born overseas as Australian citizens by descent.
2.–3. Teacher check

Preparation

Students will require internet access throughout the lesson.

Curriculum links

  • Australian Curriculum: ACHASSK147, ACHASSK135, ACHASSI123, ACHASSI126, ACHASSI128, ACHASSI129, ACHASSI131, ACHASSI132, ACHASSI133
  • NSW Syllabus: HT3-3, HT3-4
  • Vic. Curriculum: VCCCC014, VCHHK094
  • WA Curriculum: ACHASSK147, ACHASSK135, WAHASS52, WAHASS56, WAHASS59, WAHASS60, WAHASS61, WAHASS63

Note: Italicised links relate to HASS areas other than Civics and Citizenship.

Suggested teaching strategies

  • Use turn and talk for the Introduction activity, where students find a partner to discuss the definition with.
  • Jigsaw could be used for the Conclusion activity, where expert groups view a particular video story and then report back to their home groups about the story they saw and the category of citizenship.

Introduction

Students discuss with a partner and write a definition for ‘Australian citizen’, then share as a class.

Display the digital lesson which introduces what an Australian citizen is and how to become one.

Development

Provide students with the summary and worksheet to complete.

The investigation explores the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizens. It may be useful to watch a Behind the News video, Why is citizenship important? before completing the worksheet. This will introduce the idea of responsibilities so students can go on to conduct their own research.

Differentiation

  • Students requiring additional support can be provided with books or research information to use for the investigation worksheet, and discuss the questions with a partner.
  • As an extension to this lesson, students can print, cut and fold a chatterbox from the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs website (search for ‘chatterbox’) and play with it.
  • An additional activity is to interview a new Australian citizen to hear their citizenship story. Prepare practical and probing questions to find out as much as possible about their journey, and create a video of the interview.

Conclusion

Go to the Celebrating citizenship area of the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs website, and watch video stories of various Australians as a class.

Assessment

Student summary answers
1. Across: 3. evidence 4. apply 6. residential Down: 1. conferral 2. legalised 5. eligible
2. Teacher check

Worksheet answers
1. Teacher check
2. (a) citizenship by conferral, citizenship by descent, citizenship by adoption, citizenship by resumption
(b) Quan: yes (adoption)
Cheryl: yes (descent)
Janet: no
Wayan: yes (conferral)
Joanne: yes (resumption)
lmran: no

Investigation worksheet answers
1. Responsibilities—obey the law; defend Australia should the need arise; serve on a jury if called to do so; vote in federal and state or territory elections, and in a referendum
Privileges—vote in federal and state or territory elections, and in a referendum, apply for work in the Australian Public Service or in the Australian Defence Force; seek election to parliament; apply for an Australian passport and re-enter Australia freely; receive help from an Australian official while overseas; register children born overseas as Australian citizens by descent.
2.–3. Teacher check

Student Pages

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Intro 1

Lesson 1

Australian citizenship

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Intro 2

Lesson 1

Australian citizenship

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CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 1

What do you know about the terms citizenship and Australian citizenship?

How would you define them?

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 2

A citizen is a person who is recognised by a government as a member of that government's nation.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 3

Being a citizen of a nation, also called having citizenship, means the nation is entitled to protect that person. Likewise, the person has a duty to their nation.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 4

Australia

Singapore

What this ‘duty' involves differs between nations. In Australia, it includes the responsibility
of voting. In Singapore,
it includes men serving
time in the army.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 5

Australian citizenship simply means that a person is a citizen of Australia.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 6

Not everyone who lives in Australia is a citizen. People who are allowed to live in the country permanently and are not citizens are called permanent residents.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 7

Advantages that Australian citizens have over permanent residents include the right to vote, the ease of returning to Australia after international travel and the ability to have certain jobs, such as prime minister.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 8

A person becomes an Australian citizen by being born in Australia to an Australian or permanent resident parent, or when they apply for citizenship and are accepted.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 9

If a person is born outside of Australia, they are not automatically an Australian citizen, regardless of whether their parents are citizens
or permanent residents.

They must apply to become one.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 10

Applications for Australian citizenship are divided into four categories—citizenship by: conferral, descent, adoption and resumption.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 11

Citizenship by conferral can be granted to permanent residents who have lived in Australia for at least four years. (The word ‘conferral' means ‘bestowing').

Citizenship by descent can be granted to people born overseas to an Australian citizen parent.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 12

Citizenship by adoption can be granted to people born overseas and adopted by an Australian citizen.

Citizenship by resumption can be granted to people who were previously Australian citizens but lost their citizenship for certain reasons.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 13

To obtain citizenship, a person must apply for it and meet specific requirements. The requirements of each of the four types of application vary, but evidence to prove your identity, character and eligibility are needed for all.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 14

For example, when applying for citizenship by conferral, a person must already be living in Australia due to the residential requirement and also needs to be in Australia when the decision on the application is made.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 4 Slide 15

The person must also attend a ceremony to legalise the citizenship. Other types of application do not require people to be in Australia or
to attend a ceremony.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 16

Those who wish to receive citizenship by conferral are further required to take a citizenship test.

This test is designed to allow applicants to demonstrate their knowledge of Australia and the responsibilities and privileges
of citizens.

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 17

What kind of questions would you expect to see on this test?

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Slide 18

Do you think a test like this is fair when other Australian citizens don't have to take one?

CivCit Year 6 Unit 3 Lesson 1 Final Slide

Lesson 1

Complete

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Downloads

Student Summary

Summary of student page information

Worksheet

Activities for students to complete

Investigation Worksheet

An additional activity to consolidate learnings

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